Charging Stations in Utah

Use the map below to identify the charging stations that best fit your needs in the neighborhoods where you live and work.  Click on the various station “pins” for detailed facility information, including pricing, charge-times, etc.

As you search, be mindful that unlike gasoline filling stations there is significant variation among electric charging stations.  EV charging stations are classified into three levels according to output voltage and the rate at which they can charge a battery.  Level 1 charging uses a standard 120V outlet and takes 11 to 20 hours to charge a battery.  Level 2 charging is done at less than or equal to 240 volts and can power up the battery in 3 to 8 hours.  Level 3 charging uses a power output of greater than 14.4 kW and can charge a battery in approximately 30 minutes.

About EV

Electric vehicles (EVs) first came into existence in the late 1800s, but only became widely available to the public in the last decade as a result of technological advances in the 21st century.  The adoption of EVs has the potential to offer significant economic and environmental benefits for Utah.  Already EVs are helping the Wasatch Front address its current air quality challenges, and providing an economic benefit to EV owners through significant fuel cost reductions.  Please continue scrolling to learn more.

“Drive Electric Vehicles, Drive Clean Air”

Benefits of EVs

EVs, which require no gasoline and emit no pollution from their tailpipes, present a critical opportunity to improve air quality along the Wasatch Front, while at the same time reducing households’ fuel costs by approximately 80%!  Click below to learn more about the many benefits of switching to an EV.

EVs are cheaper to maintain

Maintenance for EVs costs much less than for gasoline vehicles. EVs require no oil changes and have 10 times fewer moving parts than a gasoline-powered car. There’s no engine, transmission, spark plugs, valves, fuel tank, tailpipe, distributor, starter, clutch, muffler, or catalytic converter.

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EVs are cheaper to maintain

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Improved air quality

EVs have the potential to greatly reduce vehicular emissions, such as carbon monoxide, organic compounds, nitrogen oxide, sulfur, and particulate matter. In some cases, EVs can burn 99% cleaner than traditional fuels.

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Improved air quality

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Continual environmental improvement

The energy and environmental benefits of EVs are expected to increase as older power plants are retired, and additional natural gas and renewable generation is constructed.

 

 

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Continual environmental improvement

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EVs are fun to drive

They are smooth and quiet, and their high torque – even at low speeds – provides instant accelerator response, and also better performance in snow.

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EVs are fun to drive

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Infrastructure availability

EVs have the benefit of flexible fueling: They can charge overnight at a residence (or a fleet facility), at a workplace, or at public charging stations.

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Infrastructure availability

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Community EV efforts

The deployment of EVs promotes the shift to a more diverse transportation system and positively impacts air quality. For that reason, there are a number of advocacy and outreach groups that provide additional information about EVs.

Learn more about:

 logo 3   UDEQ   lfca   ucair_logo_fullcolor

Community EV efforts

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1,400+

Plug-in vehicles on Utah’s roads

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More than 80% of Utah’s EVs are registered within the Wasatch Front. Additionally, Utah is home to over 24,000 hybrid vehicles.

87

Publicly available electric fueling stations in Utah

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The state also has over 193 public electric charging outlets. Electric fueling stations make up 35% of Utah’s public alternative fuels stations. Did you know that electricity used to operate motor vehicles is exempt from state fuel taxes? Click here for more information.

$1,500

Available state tax incentives

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Vehicles registered in Utah that are powered by electricity are eligible for an income tax credit of 35% of the vehicle purchase price, up to $1,500. Plug-in hybrid EVs are eligible for a tax credit of $1,000. Click here for more information.

50%

Amount of pollution from mobile sources in the Salt Lake area

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An influx of EVs could make a significant improvement to Utah’s air quality. The air quality benefits would be invaluable in Utah’s counties that are out of compliance with federal air quality standards. These non-attainment areas include: Salt Lake, Tooele, Utah, Davis, Weber, Box Elder, and Cache counties. Click here for more information.

EV Guide

Below is a basic guide to the many EVs currently available at dealerships in Utah.  Please click on the cars to view vehicle specifications and pricing.

Note: Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) have an all-electric motor, and plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) have both an electric motor and an internal combustion engine.

Vehicle Specs

'14 Porsche Panamera (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $90,733 - $95,138
  • 50
  • 16 electric + gas / 540 total
  • RWD
  • 4
  • 4
  • Large Car
  • 416 @ 5500 RPM
  • 40 cu. ft.











'14 Porsche Panamera (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'15 Toyota Prius (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $29,812 - $30,233
  • 95
  • 11 electric + gas / 540 total
  • FWD
  • 5
  • 4
  • Midsize Car
  • 134 @ 5200 RPM
  • 34.2 ft.
  • 21.6 cu. ft.











'15 Toyota Prius (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'15 Ford C-MAX Energi (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $30,662 - $31,407
  • 88
  • 20 electric + gas / 550 total
  • FWD
  • 5
  • 4
  • Midsize Station Wagon
  • 188 @ 6000 RPM
  • 34.8
  • 118.9 cu. ft.
  • 19.2 cu. ft.











'15 Ford C-MAX Energi (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'14 Cadillac ELR (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $69,809 - $71,840
  • 82
  • 37 electric / 340 total
  • FWD
  • 4
  • 2
  • Compact Car
  • 181
  • 38.4 ft.
  • 10.5 cu. ft.











'14 Cadillac ELR (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'14 BMW i3 (BEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $37,845 - $39,498
  • 124
  • 81
  • RWD
  • 4
  • 4
  • Sub Compact Car
  • 170 @ 4800 RPM
  • 32.4
  • 36.9 cu. ft.











'14 BMW i3 (BEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'15 BMW i8 (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $135,078 - $137,551
  • 76
  • 15 electric / 330 total
  • RWD
  • 4
  • 2
  • Compact Car
  • 362 @ 5800 RPM
  • 40.4 ft.
  • 4.7 cu. ft.











'15 BMW i8 (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

14 Tesla Model S (85 kW-h)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $78,370 - $83,769
  • 89
  • 265
  • RWD
  • 7
  • 4
  • Sedan
  • 362 @ 6000 RPM
  • 37
  • 31.6 cu.ft.











14 Tesla Model S (85 kW-h)


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Vehicle Specs

'14 Ford Focus (BEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $20,995 - $25,995
  • 105
  • 76
  • FWD
  • 5
  • 4
  • com
  • 143
  • 40.7
  • 105.2 cu. ft.











'14 Ford Focus (BEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'14 Honda Fit (BEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $36,625
  • 118
  • 82
  • FWD
  • 5
  • 4
  • Compact Car
  • 100/75 @3695~10320
  • 34.3
  • 89.3
  • 49.2











'14 Honda Fit (BEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'17 Honda Accord (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $30,613 - $39,780
  • 115
  • 13 electric + gas / 570 total
  • FWD
  • 5
  • 4
  • Midsize Car
  • 196 @ 6200 RPM
  • 38.1 ft.
  • 12.3 cu. ft.











'17 Honda Accord (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'17 Ford Fusion Energi (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $33,496 - $34,441
  • 97
  • 21 miles all electric. 42 mpg. Up to 610 miles from combined electric, gasoline, and regenerative braking
  • FWD
  • 5
  • 4
  • Midsize Station Wagon
  • 188 @ 6000 RPM
  • 37.6 ft.
  • 111.0 cu. ft.
  • 8.2 cu. ft.











'17 Ford Fusion Energi (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'17 Chevy Volt (PHEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $31,969 - $33,174
  • 106
  • 53 electric / 420 total
  • FWD
  • 4
  • 4
  • Compact Car
  • 149
  • 10.6 cu. ft.











'17 Chevy Volt (PHEV)


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Vehicle Specs

'16 Nissan Leaf (BEV)
  • Price Range
  • MPG Equivalent
  • Range
  • Drivetrain
  • Max Seating Capacity
  • Doors
  • EPA Class
  • Horsepower
  • Turn Radius
  • EPA Total Interior
  • EPA Trunk or Cargo
  • $25,708 - $27,883
  • 114
  • City 126/Hwy 101/Comb 114
  • FWD
  • 5
  • 4
  • Midsize Car
  • 107
  • 17.1
  • 116.4 cu. ft.
  • 30.0 cu. ft.











'16 Nissan Leaf (BEV)


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Savings Calculator

The average Utahn commutes 22 minutes to work each day.  If that total commute time of 44 minutes translates to 30 miles, commuters driving a standard 2014 gasoline fueled vehicle can expect to save $1,400 per year on fuel costs associated with their commute alone.  That’s a fuel cost savings of over 80%!

Enter your car’s MPG rating along with your daily commute information, and select your EV of choice to determine what your savings will be.

Three simple steps

Get Started

How many miles per gallon does your current car get?

MILES PER GALLON

How many miles do you drive in an average day?

MILES PER DAY

Select the Utah-available EV you're interested in purchasing to see the benefits of making the switch.

'14 Porsche Panamera (PHEV)
'15 Toyota Prius (PHEV)
'15 Ford C-MAX Energi (PHEV)
'14 Cadillac ELR (PHEV)
'14 BMW i3 (BEV)
'15 BMW i8 (PHEV)
14 Tesla Model S (85 kW-h)
'14 Ford Focus (BEV)
'14 Honda Fit (BEV)
'17 Honda Accord (PHEV)
'17 Ford Fusion Energi (PHEV)
'17 Chevy Volt (PHEV)
'15 Nissan Leaf (BEV)
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Let's count the perks

$

Estimated Annual Fuel Savings

$

EV Cost After Incentives

$

Cumulative Tax Credits
and Incentives

$

MONTHLY Fuel Savings

$

WEEKLY Fuel Savings

$

DAILY Fuel Savings

$

Total Annual EV Fueling Cost

lbs

EV's ANNUAL CARBON FOOTPRINT

%

CARBON REDUCTION

lbs

ANNUAL CARBON REDUCTION

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Testimonials

Testimonial

I am very pleased with my Chevrolet Volt. It gets phenomenal gas mileage. I am averaging around 300 miles per gallon. It has great acceleration and has the performance of a sports car. During the 45 day Legislative session I have enough range that I never have to fill up on gas. It is a great car and I recommend it to anyone that wants phenomenal gas mileage in a very comfortable car with better than expected performance and  a very comfortable ride.

- Rep. Dave Lifferth

“I live in Herriman and drive to the Capitol building every day; about a 60 mile round trip. My Chevy Volt has a battery range between 40 and 50 miles. Charging at home and the ability to charge at work (thanks to our workplace for installing Level 2 chargers!) enables me to go a month and a half before having to fill the gas tank up with 9 gallons of fuel. Put another way, it takes me about 45 days to burn through 9 gallons of fuel, and I drive ~1,600 miles/month.”

- Chad

“I have a Toyota Prius which is a great car. I have no regrets. It’s good for the environment, fun to drive, and gets great mileage. It’s also a very quiet car and performs superbly. I absolutely love it.”

- Pam

“I love my Tesla. Driving to work and around town costs me about $1.40/day to travel 40 miles. But, here are the real reasons I drive it: one, it cuts my carbon footprint, so I feel better pulling my horse trailer with my diesel pickup; and, two, it is a rocket.”

- Kem

“In October of 2012 I purchased a Chevy Volt and installed 4.48 kWh of solar on my home and 40kWh of solar on my business.  I made numerous trips to Idaho, California, Moab, Las Vegas, and St. George, driving the Volt nearly 100% electric.  Even with my long trips, we now only spend about $100/year on gas and fill the Volt up with sunshine.  In addition to the environmental benefits and fuel savings, the Volt has only been in the shop for two oil changes in 50,000 miles of operation.

In April I drove a Tesla P85 to St. George, Moab, Fort Collins, and then back to Salt Lake City. I used superchargers along the way, which generally only required 15 minutes of charge time in order to make it to the next station. The P85 is the fastest car I have ever driven, and trust me, I have driven fast cars – my dad is a collector.”

- Steve

“My LEAF was the first one Nissan officially delivered in Utah. After nearly 24,000 miles, I can say without hesitation it is by far the best car I have ever owned. I power it with solar panels, and thus produce zero emissions, but even charging a LEAF from the grid in Utah emits less than half the amount of greenhouse gases that an average gasoline car produces. Moreover, the cost of that electricity is like paying 65¢ per gallon at the pump. Speaking of costs, because my LEAF does not use oil, filters, spark plugs, belts, mufflers, its maintenance is absolutely minimal. And the icing on the cake is that my LEAF is not just cleaner and cheaper, but also a superior car: more powerful, more nimble, quieter, a joy to drive. What’s not to like? Everyone’s a winner!”

- Mark

I purchased my Nissan Leaf 9 months ago and have already driven 12,000 miles. The car that I traded in was a 2001 Subaru Forester that had ~180k miles and was starting to have potentially expensive major mechanical issues. I was getting 21 mpg and spending ~$220/mo on gasoline but now I’m paying only $200/mo on my Leaf lease (so it was basically a budget neutral change). I love my Leaf and have been able to commute ~50 miles/day this whole time with only the Level 1 charger (uses the standard 120v wall outlets). I am glad to do what little I can to help the environment and am excited about the extended range EVs scheduled to come out in 2017 when my Leaf lease is up (I’m thinking a jet black Tesla Model X would look great in my garage!) =)

- Andrew

Driving an electric car is like the thrill of driving for the first time. Electric cars are a very simple, elegant piece of machinery, capable of smoothing and exciting each and every ride you take. I built my own electric car, and it has been on of the more satisfying experiences in my life.

- Mikey

In 2012, I bought my first electric car, a Chevy Volt. Since then, I have adopted a zero-emission life-style. My life happens within a 40 mile radius, ranging from Snowbird, to the Salt Lake City airport, and my offices in Cottonwood Heights and Park City. My annual gas consumption is so small.

- Hanko

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